Foreign Words Used in English

Mensch

vocabhunt-learn-english-vocabulary-mensch

 

...People were nostalgic for the era of bourgeois democracy, for a Venezuela that worked. Not a soldier, not a raving messiah in a red beret, but a mensch in a baggy business suit who knew how to run a government.
(/mɛntʃ/)
Noun

1. A person of strength, integrity and honor or compassion.
2. A gentleman.

From the post: How Venezuela went from a wealthy South American country to a failing state
Source: Venezuela, a Failing State (newyorker.com)

Campesino

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... “We first heard of Chávez in 1992, when he attempted the coup,” she said. “My husband and I started studying his words. From jail, he was sending out strategic lines, about Venezuela’s whole situation—historical, economic, national, international. It was a complete analysis, from 1811, more than twenty constitutions. He was very wise. And we were convinced: This is the man. He was a campesino, very simple. Everybody would be equal. We started working for his release.”
(/ˌkɑm pɛˈsi nɔ/)
Noun

1. An agricultural worker in Latin America.

From the post: How Venezuela went from a wealthy South American country to a failing state
Source: Venezuela, a Failing State (newyorker.com)

Nom de Plume

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... In 1887, he self-published his “Unua Libro,” or “First Book,” a primer on the proposed language, with explanatory materials in Russian. It contained a pronunciation guide, a dictionary, and a grammar, plus translations of the Lord’s Prayer, an excerpt from the Hebrew Bible, a poem by Heine, and other items. He called the language the lingvo internacia, but people soon began referring to it as Esperanto, after the nom de plume that he had given himself as the book’s author, Doktoro Esperanto (Doctor Hopeful).
(/ˌnɒm də ˈpluːm/)
Noun

1. A pen name or pseudonym

From the post: The dream of Esperanto bringing about world peace
Source: A language to unite humankind (newyorker.com)

Arriviste

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... Almost famous people have a tendency to act even more obnoxiously than the famous ones. Graydon Carter, who knows a thing or two about fame, has this parable about a peasant like me arriving in New York from his hamlet and trying to make it in the big city like in a Balzac novel. The provincial enters a dark room and tries to find a door that will enable him to enter another room and so on until he finally reaches success but at each room the door to the next is more difficult to find. Usually in New York society very few arrivistes make it past the first room. I have no idea what he’s talking and it’s probably why his magazine is a giant bore.
(/ˌæ.ɹɪˈviːst/)
Noun

1. Someone who has climbed to a new social class but has yet to be accepted by the social class
2. upstart, newcomer, late arrival, nouveau riche, generally characterized as an ambitious, brash or arrogant person who has yet to integrate with his or her new social group.

From the post: How ELLE magazine ruined an incredible interview with enigmatic fashion icon Rei Kawakubo
Source: ELLE on Earth (observer.com)

Lingchi

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... It became clear to me that Anne was hell-bent on sabotaging the piece after I had dared that day to cancel our manic ever-changing meetings. She was not in a position of power to outright kill the piece, since Robbie had originally commissioned it, but she was ready to let it die by Lingchi, a thousand cuts.
(/ˈlɪŋtʃi/)
Noun

1. A form of execution used in China in which the condemned was killed by methodical removal of body parts with a knife.
2. "Death by a thousand cuts"

From the post: How ELLE magazine ruined an incredible interview with enigmatic fashion icon Rei Kawakubo
Source: ELLE on Earth (observer.com)